Vietnamese Lifestyle – A Mix Of Traditional Values And Modern Life

Vietnam is known as a largely populated country where is home to a lot of regional differences which attract many travelers to discover. Among regions, their ways of living are different and embody the characteristics of Vietnamese tradition.

August 12, 2017 /MarketersMedia/ —

The distinct lifestyle is based on the location, age, urban or rural. Some studies show that 65% of the Vietnamese still live in rural areas. The lifestyle in the countryside mainly reflects the traditional life in Vietnam. As an agricultural country, the large majority of people in the village live by farming, raising livestock and making handicraft with the habit of working together as well as being kind to each other.

In the Mekong Delta and coastal areas, the people tend to feed themselves and are able to sell their products in local markets. Thus, foreign people with visa for Vietnam are recommended to visit at least one local market in their trip. In the lowlands, travelers will see that the villages have beautiful bamboo hedges, green paddy fields, buffalos. Not only that, they can also easily come across an image of the villagers wearing the traditional conical hat featuring part of the Vietnamese national costume. Meanwhile, the life in the city has changed rapidly in urban areas. There are many modern skyscrapers, business office, good transport links as well as administrative work for the growing population.

The most outstanding characteristics of Vietnamese lifestyle are cohesiveness in solidarity in the family, village ties, clan, as well as the philanthropic spirit of humanism. The Vietnamese people usually consider ethics as the basis of behaviors in relations among people.

Additionally, the family life takes a significant role to the Vietnamese as well as to most people in South East Asia countries. Generally, there are two to three generations living in the same house together. Children can support their parents to do household chores after school.

Confucianism mostly influences the characteristics of Vietnamese lifestyle. There are distinctions between the young and the old people. However, several aspects of life remain unchanged. According to the tradition of the Vietnamese, the youth are still taught to respect parents, grandparents and value family ties. The old is often respected by the young person not only in their family but also in general. However, this is now the age of smartphones, and some things have gone quickly in the cities which the elderly may never understand. It is to be hoped that respect and tradition are not lost through the time.

Canadian citizens traveling to Vietnam can discover the diversity of the country while understanding the natural friendliness and hospitality of the local people. As a requirement, they need to get a Vietnam visa Canada in order to pay a visit to this country.

Apart from the traditional way of obtaining a visa at Embassy or Consulate, travelers are now able to apply for a visa on arrival by hiring a government-registered company such as Green Vietnam visa service. Thanks to the fast development of internet and technology, foreign people can obtain this visa type at any place around the world as well as take advantage of it to save their time and money. It is considered as an excellent choice for those who are planning to visit Vietnam by airway and live far away from the Vietnam Embassy in their country.

To learn more about the convenient ways to obtain a Vietnam visa with the hassle-free support of www.greenvisa.io agency, Canadian travelers can access the visa official site by clicking here.

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