After drowning, new rules, Mexico City canals see drop-off

Passengers are helped to step between trajineras, colorful passenger boats typically rented by tourists, families, and groups of young people, as they board a boat in Xochimilco, Mexico City, Friday, Sept. 6, 2019. The usually festive Nativitas pier was subdued and largely empty Friday afternoon, with some boat operators and vendors estimating that business was down by 80% on the first weekend following the drowning death of a youth that was captured on cellphone video and seen widely in Mexico. Borough officials stood on the pier to inform visitors of new regulations that went into effect Friday limiting the consumption of alcohol, prohibiting the use of speakers and instructing visitors to remain seated.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A police officer patrols on a bridge over a canal filled with scores of parked and a handful of occupied trajineras, the colorful passenger boats typically rented by tourists, families, and groups of young people, in Xochimilco, Mexico City, Friday, Sept. 6, 2019. The usually festive Nativitas pier was subdued and largely empty Friday afternoon, with some boat operators and vendors estimating that business was down by 80% on the first weekend following the drowning death of a youth that was captured on cellphone video and seen widely in Mexico. Borough officials stood on the pier to inform visitors of new regulations that went into effect Friday limiting the consumption of alcohol, prohibiting the use of speakers and instructing visitors to remain seated.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)
A gondolier takes a photo for a group of Americans after they took a ride on a trajinera, colorful passenger boats typically rented by tourists, families, and groups of young people, in Xochimilco, Mexico City, Friday, Sept. 6, 2019. The usually festive Nativitas pier was subdued and largely empty Friday afternoon, with some boat operators and vendors estimating that business was down by 80% on the first weekend following the drowning death of a youth that was captured on cellphone video and seen widely in Mexico. Borough officials stood on the pier to inform visitors of new regulations that went into effect Friday limiting the consumption of alcohol, prohibiting the use of speakers and instructing visitors to remain seated.(AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

MEXICO CITY — New rules including alcohol limits are in place for Mexico City's famed Xochimilco canals as the government moves to crack down on hard-core partiers following a drowning.

Officials hope to encourage a more peaceful atmosphere for families and tourists and reduce dangerous behavior by those who treat the canal boats like floating nightclubs, drinking to excess, dancing on tables and even brawling.

But workers say business has fallen off by about 80%. Some people are perhaps unnerved by the accident, and others put off by the anti-partying measures.

At stake are the livelihoods of thousands of boatmen, owners and those on the margins who sell tourists food, drink, flowers and trinkets.

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