Judge weighs new Motel 6 settlement in immigration lawsuit

FILE - This Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, shows a Motel 6 in Phoenix. A revised settlement for Motel 6 guests who say the national chain invaded their privacy by giving their information to immigration authorities is returning to court for a judge's review. A federal judge is to decide Friday, July 19, 2019, on the proposal increasing to $10 million the total amount available for claims. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
FILE - This Jan. 3, 2018 file photo shows a Motel 6 in SeaTac, Wash. A revised settlement for Motel 6 guests who say the national chain invaded their privacy by giving their information to immigration authorities is returning to court for a judge's review. A federal judge is to decide Friday, July 19, 2019, on the proposal increasing to $10 million the total amount available for claims. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)

PHOENIX — A revised settlement for Motel 6 guests who say the national chain invaded their privacy by giving their information to immigration authorities is returning to court Friday for a judge's review.

A federal judge is to decide during an afternoon hearing on the new proposal making $10 million available for awards to claims by members of the class action suit.

A class member could get $75 if they were a registered guest, up to $10,000 if they were placed in deportation proceedings as a result of having their information shared and as much as $200,000 if a person incurred legal fees to defend his or her presence in the United States.

The proposed settlement also expands the class to include guests at Motel 6 between February 2015 and June 2019.

The Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund sued Motel 6 in January 2018, saying that giving guests' information to immigration agents without a warrant violated privacy and civil rights laws.

The chain's owner, G6 Hospitality LLC in Carrollton, Texas, said it later issued a directive banning the practice.

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich earlier this year asked U.S. District Court Judge David Campbell not to approve the earlier version of the agreement between the two sides, saying that only a fraction of the thousands of people directly connected to the case would benefit because most of the money would have gone to migrant advocacy groups.

Campbell denied Brnovich's request because the sides had told the court they were renegotiating the agreement.

Must Read

Icelandic budget airline WOW Air ceases operations

Mar 28, 2019

Icelandic budget airline WOW Air says it has ceased operations, stranding passengers across two...

Israel's national library acquires famed Judaica...

Jan 19, 2017

The National Library of Israel says it has acquired what is considered the world's greatest private...

Sudanese Jews recall long-lost world with...

Jan 26, 2017

Sudan's Jews once made up the smallest Jewish community in the Middle East, a close-knit group of...

6-day war begets 50 years of strife for Israel

May 29, 2017

For Israel, 6-day war in which it vanquished several Arab armies, begets 50-year fight with...

AP PHOTOS: In Israel, antique car collectors find...

Oct 6, 2017

AP PHOTOS: Each weekend Israeli car collectors gather with their beauties _ and take a step back in...

Sign up now!

About Us

Walk To The Place offers travel news of popular destinations for travelers with the urge to explore these places.

Contact us: sales[at]walktotheplace.com

Subscribe Now!