Trump aide dismisses Statue of Liberty 'huddled masses' poem

FILE - In this Nov. 5, 2015, file photo, visitors view the Statue of Liberty during a ferry ride to Liberty Island in New York. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. Miller says the Statue of Liberty is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested the statue had little to do with immigrants. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
FILE- In this circa 1950 photo shows a bronze plaque of the poem by Poet Emma Lazurus on Statue of Liberty in New York. In 1903, the poem was engraved on the bronze plaque and mounted inside the pedestal's lower level. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. Miller says the Statue of Liberty is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested the statue had little to do with immigrants. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this May 7, 2015, file photo, people look at the Statue of Liberty from a ferry boat in Jersey City, N.J. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. Miller says the Statue of Liberty is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested the statue had little to do with immigrants. The National Park Services says Lazarus' sonnet depicts the statue as a symbol of immigration and opportunity. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
White House senior policy adviser Stephen Miller speaks during the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
FILE - In this undated photo of a group of immigrants, who arrived at Ellis Island in New York, wait in line to begin immigration proceedings. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. Miller says the Statue of Liberty is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested the statue had little to do with immigrants. The National Park Services says Lazarus' sonnet depicts the statue as a symbol of immigration and opportunity. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - This undated image shows American poet Emma Lazarus. A poem by Emma Lazarus added to the base of the Statue of Liberty that welcomes immigrants has been dismissed by Stephen Miller, an adviser to President Donald Trump. Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2014, file photo, the Statue of Liberty is surrounded by fog on Liberty Island in New York. Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2017, that the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty. Miller says the Statue of Liberty is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested the statue had little to do with immigrants. (AP Photo/Santiago Lyon, File)

A poem at the Statue of Liberty that is a national symbol for the country's embrace of immigrants became the topic of a rancorous exchange Wednesday at a White House news conference to announce President Donald Trump's push for immigration reform.

Senior White House aide Stephen Miller told reporters the poem written by Emma Lazarus about the "huddled masses" is not part of the original Statue of Liberty.

Miller said the statue is a "symbol of American liberty lighting the world" and suggested it had little to do with immigrants.

Miller's comment prompted ridicule on social media and angry responses from immigrant rights advocates.

Miller was responding to a question from CNN reporter Jim Acosta asking if the Trump administration's new merit-based green card proposal was keeping with U.S. tradition.

The reporter read a line of the Lazarus sonnet, "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses."

"The poem you were referring to was added later," Miller said. "It's not actually part of the originally Statue of Liberty."

The National Park Service says Lazarus' sonnet depicts the statue "as the 'Mother of Exiles:' a symbol of immigration and opportunity — symbols associated with the Statue of Liberty today."

The statue was a gift from France commemorating its alliance with the United States during the American Revolution. Edouard de Laboulaye, a French political thinker and abolitionist, proposed the idea of the statue and made sure broken shackle and chain were at the right foot of the statue.

Writers and authors later asked Emma Lazarus, a poet and descendant of Jewish immigrants, to write a sonnet to be sold at an auction to raise money for a pedestal to hold the Statue of Liberty.

She wrote "The New Colossus" on Nov. 2, 1883, inspired by the plight of immigrants and refugees and her own experiences. The poem appeared in Joseph Pulitzer's New York World and The New York Times.

She died four years later and the poem eventually faded from public memory.

In 1901, a Lazarus friend, Georgina Schuyler, found a book containing the poem and started an effort to resurrect the work. Her words were eventually inscribed on a plaque and placed on the statue's pedestal.

The poem reads, "Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore."

The Statue of Liberty and nearby Ellis Island have since become welcoming symbols for immigrants and refugees coming to the United States.

It draws thousands of visitors each day.

___

Follow Russell Contreras on Twitter at http://twitter.com/russcontreras

Must Read

Supporters of Roosevelt National Park seek to block refinery

May 27, 2017

Meridian Energy Group is developing what it bills as "the cleanest refinery on the planet" in western North Dakota, despite concerns about its proximity to picturesque Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Spring break ideas: from beaches to Europe to new museums

Feb 15, 2017

It's that time of year when we start thinking about ending the winter blahs with a spring break trip

Interior chief spent more than $53K on 3 helicopter trips

Dec 8, 2017

Newly released records show Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spent more than $53,000 on three helicopter trips this summer, including one that allowed him to return to Washington in time for a horseback ride with Vice President Mike Pence

People also read these

Supporters of Roosevelt National Park seek to block refinery

May 27, 2017

Meridian Energy Group is developing what it bills as "the cleanest refinery on the planet" in western North Dakota, despite concerns about its proximity to picturesque Theodore Roosevelt National Park

Spring break ideas: from beaches to Europe to new museums

Feb 15, 2017

It's that time of year when we start thinking about ending the winter blahs with a spring break trip

Interior chief spent more than $53K on 3 helicopter trips

Dec 8, 2017

Newly released records show Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke spent more than $53,000 on three helicopter trips this summer, including one that allowed him to return to Washington in time for a horseback ride with Vice President Mike Pence